Tag Archives: Favorite Fotos

Ferrell’s Favorite Fotos # 8

Traveling in the Wadi Farah (or Faria) in 1982 with the late Jimmy Cravens of Tampa, Florida, we came upon a shepherd moving his sheep from one side of the road to the other. This scene calls to mind Psalm 23.

The LORD is my shepherd; I shall not want. He makes me lie down in green pastures. He leads me beside still waters. (23:1-2 ESV)

Sheep beside still water in Wadi Farah. FerrellJenkins.blog.

Sheep in green pastures, beside still water, in Wadi Farah. Scanned from slide made by Ferrell Jenkins in March, 1982.

This scene is located in a region often called the West Bank, part of the Palestinian Authority. The Wadi Farah leads from near Tirzah to the Jordan Valley.

Biblical characters such as Abraham and Jacob likely used this route to travel from the Jordan Valley to Shechem.

Ferrell’s Favorite Fotos #4

Of the places David McClister and I tried to locate in Syria in 2002, this was the most difficult.

The Syrian village of Ribleh. Site of the ancient town of Riblah where Nebuchadnezzar set up his headquarters, and where he killed the sons of Jechoniah in his presence, put out his eyes, bound him, and took him to Babylon. FerrellJenkins.blog.

The Syrian village of Ribleh. Site of the ancient town of Riblah where Nebuchadnezzar set up his headquarters, and where he killed the sons of Zedekiah in his presence, put out his eyes, bound him, and took him to Babylon. Scanned slide photo by Ferrell Jenkins.

See the Index of articles about Babylon, including a few references to Riblah, here.

Zedekiah, puppet king of Judah, tried to escape capture by the Babylonians. He fled Jerusalem but was captured on the plains of Jericho and brought to Riblah. There Nebuchadnezzar passed sentence on him. His sons were slaughtered in his sight and he was bound with brass fetters and taken to Babylon. The date was 586 B.C. (2 Kings 25:5-7; see also Jeremiah 39:5-6; 52:9-10).

Ferrell’s Favorite Fotos #3

It was quite a thrill when I first found and walked on this nice stretch of Roman Road near the Turkish village of Saglikli about 12 miles north of Tarsus of Cilicia. Tarsus served as one of the great crossroads of history. It was the home of Saul of Tarsus, later known as the Apostle Paul who described it as “no insignificant city” (Acts 21:39; 9:11; 22:3).

Roman road north of Tarsus in Cilicia. ferrelljenkins.blog.

Roman Road near the Turkish village of Saglikli, about 12 miles north of Tarsus in Cilicia. Home of Saul of Tarsus. Photo by Ferrell Jenkins.

This road that was constructed about A.D. 200 during the reign of the Emperor Septimius Severus. Did Paul and Silas follow this same route on an earlier road during the second journey?