Venice and Mark

This view shows one corner of the Doge’s palace and the columns with the lion representing Mark the Evangelist. (Some of us would simply say Mark, the writer of the gospel that bears his name.) The buildings visible in the distance are across the Grand Canal.

Note the pigeons resting on the lamp post. There are now fewer pigeons in the Square than in the past because the city has quit feeding then.

Doges Palace and view from St. Mark's Square. Photo by Ferrell Jenkins.

Doges Palace and view from St. Mark's Square. Photo by Ferrell Jenkins.

St. Mark’s Cathedral and Square is one of the best known tourist attractions in the world. The building is of the Byzantine style, but the liturgy is Roman Catholic. Madden explains how a Byzantine building happens to be in Italy.

The Byzantine style of St. Mark’s Cathedral bespeaks the maritime past of the Venetian republic, and its long range interests in the eastern Mediterranean, the Mare Nostrum of the Romans (A Religious Guide to Europe, 298).

Clock Tower and the Domes of St. Mark's. Photo by Ferrell Jenkins.

Clock Tower and the Domes of St. Mark's. Photo by Ferrell Jenkins.

It is alleged by some that the body (or relics) of St. Mark the Evangelist were brought to Venice in the 9th century B.C. by Venetian merchants.

Today we traveled from Venice to Florence. It rained most of that time. By the time we reached Florence we had some clearing. At the moment it is bright outside.

Everyone in the group is doing well.

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