Tag Archives: apologetics

Important book; good price

Last evening I learned that Peter J. Williams’ new book, Can We Trust the Gospels?, will be available in Amazon Kindle format from today to May 4 for $3.99. The paperback book is about $14.00.

Williams is Principal of Tyndale House, Cambridge. Many of our readers will be familiar with Tyndale House and their work. For those who are not familiar here is a description:

Tyndale House is a dynamic academic hub that specialises in the languages, history and cultural context of the Bible. We bring together outstanding Christian researchers from around the world with the aim of developing Bible literacy in the Church and beyond. We want to enable all those who read the Bible to understand and appreciate it more.

Just a few days ago I received a copy of William’s book in Logos format. Already knowing of Williams work in this field, I am impressed with the book.

Williams is Principal of Tyndale House, Cambridge.

Your young people need a copy of this book, too.

Cold-Case Christianity, free today

Cold-Case Christianity by J. Warner Wallace is available free in Kindle format March 10-11. The foreword is written by Lee Strobel. The publisher’s promo information says,


Written by an L. A. County homicide detective and former atheist, Cold-Case Christianity examines the claims of the New Testament using the skills and strategies of a hard-to-convince criminal.
Christianity could be defined as a “cold case”: it makes a claim about an event from the distant past for which there is little forensic evidence. In Cold-Case Christianity, J. Warner Wallace uses his nationally recognized skills as a homicide detective to look at the evidence and eyewitnesses behind Christian beliefs. Including gripping stories from his career and the visual techniques he developed in the courtroom, Wallace uses illustration to examine the powerful evidence that validates the claims of Christianity.
A unique apologetic that speaks to readers’ intense interest in detective stories, Cold-Case Christianity inspires readers to have confidence in Christ as it prepares them to articulate the case for Christianity.

Click on the book cover for more information, and to order.

HT: Brooks Cochran; Gospel eBooks.

Did you know C. S. Lewis died Nov. 22, 1963?

Recently I have been reading C. S. Lewis – A Life: Eccentric Genius, Reluctant Prophet by Alister McGrath. He says that Warnie found his brother dead at the foot of his bed at 5:30 p.m. [in Oxford], “Friday, 22 November 1963.” Then comes this paragraph:

At that same time, President John F. Kennedy’s motorcade left Dallas’s Love Field Airport, beginning its journey downtown. An hour later, Kennedy was fatally wounded by a sniper. He was pronounced dead at Parkland Memorial Hospital. Media reports of Lewis’s death were completely overshadowed by the substantially more significant tragedy that unfolded that day in Dallas.

C. S. Lewis was buried in the churchyard of Holy Trinity, Headington Quarry, Oxford after a private, and very small service. Warnie chose a phrase from a Shakespearean calendar that was in their home back in Belfast at the time of their mother’s death in August 1908: “Men must endure their going hence.” The quotation is from Shakespeare’s King Lear.

The grave of C. S. Lewis. Photo by Ferrell Jenkins.

The grave of C. S. Lewis. Photo by Ferrell Jenkins.

McAlister suggests that a better epitaph might be one from Lewis’s own words,

a seed patiently waiting in the earth: waiting to come up a flower in the Gardner’s good time, up into the real world, the real waking. I suppose that our whole present life, looked back on from there, will seem only a drowsy half-waking. We are here in the land of dreams. But cock-crow is coming.

C. S. Lewis is appreciated by many for the Chronicles of Narnia. Others have found his popular apologetic writings helpful. More information, including photos, about sites associated with Lewis is available here.

Historical Reliability of Acts

Apologetics 315 recently called attention to a PDF document by James Hickey on The Historical Reliability of Acts: Support from Extra-Biblical Primary Sources. I thought this document might be helpful, along with our photo illustrations, to those studying the Book of Acts.

https://i1.wp.com/3.bp.blogspot.com/-4sfuh5jjh8A/UD_H2fkFeII/AAAAAAAAJz4/a0OYCvz3zJk/s1600/historical-reliability-acts.jpg

You may download the document here, or from Apologetics 315 (above).

Charles Darwin – Galapagos Finches

HT: Defend the Word

C. S. Lewis – Beyond Narnia

If you are interested in C. S. Lewis and his writings, you might enjoy a recent one hour documentary about him. The trailer may be seen here. The complete video is available here. A DVD is available for purchase.

The photo below is of Holy Trinity Church, Headington Quarry, Oxford. This is the church Lewis and his brother Warnie attended. Both are buried in the church graveyard.

Holy Trinity Church, Headington Quarry. Photo by Ferrell Jenkins.

Holy Trinity Church, Headington Quarry. Photo by Ferrell Jenkins.

More information, including photos, about sites associated with Lewis is available here.

HT:  N.T. Resources Blog and Between Two World.

C. S. Lewis on the cover of Time

Time announced Vladimir Putin as Person of the Year today.

Many do not know that C. S. Lewis was featured on the cover of Time, September 8, 1947. The article about him was titled, “His heresy: Christianity.” If you have enjoyed the Narnia books and movie, or if you have read his apologetic books, I think you would enjoy our pictorial essay on sites associated with Lewis at Oxford, England. Click here.

C. S. Lewis on the cover of Time.

You may view the first trailer for The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian here.