Good illustrations for teaching

Every teacher of the Bible should be looking for good illustrations to help convey biblical truths. Ezekiel used a brick with a sketch of Jerusalem on it to teach about the destruction of the city (Ezekiel 4:1). Jeremiah broke a clay vessel to teach the same lesson (Jeremiah 19).

Jesus used sowers, birds, and flowers of the field to teach important lessons (Mt. 13:18; 6:26; 6:28).

About a year ago we learned that a contractor in the Netherlands has built a replica of Noah’s ark. W. Frank Walton has called my attention to a series of photos by “Paul the Dane” showing both replica from both the outside and the inside. These photographer holds copyright to the photos, but his page says “permission from author required for commercial use.” I take this to mean that non-commercial use, such as Bible classes, is allowed. For information about Noah’s ark read Genesis 6-9.

Paul the Dane has these photos posted at Pbase. Click here for his page. He also has some nice photos of Damascus. He says this of the ark photos:

It was built approximately to scale, however is 1/2 the length and 1/3 the width of the Biblical dimensions. It was built to show the world how massive the Ark was and how so many animals could have been housed for a long time.

Here is one of the nice exterior views.

Frequently I go to Pbase to search for photos I might need of some historical site that I have not visited. Be sure you ask for permission if the photographer does not grant such.

A few years ago I wrote an article, “Using Photographs to Ilustrate Lessons” for Biblical Insights. Read it here. At the Biblical Studies Info page I have links to numerous sources of good photos of the Bible lands. Look here, then under Photos.

Update: J. P. van de Giessen has pointed me to his post about the ark here. He has some photos of the ark while under construction. Nothing quite like having a “reporter” on the spot! The official web page is here. It also includes photos of the construction.

One response to “Good illustrations for teaching

  1. I’ve just enjoyed taking about 20 minutes to read through your last blogs. Thanks for your thoughts, all very readable and in digestible form.

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