Second Temple wall of Jerusalem uncovered

The Israel Antiquities Authority announced last week the discovery of a wall below modern “Mount Zion” that dates from the time of the Hasmonean kings to the destruction about A.D. 70. Here are a few comments in the official press release.

An exciting discovery in Jerusalem constituting extraordinary remains of the wall of the city from the time of the Second Temple (second century BCE-70 CE) that was built by the Hasmonean kings and was destroyed during the Great Revolt, and also the remains of a city wall from the Byzantine period (324-640 CE) which was built on top of it, were uncovered in an extensive excavation that is currently underway on Mount Zion. The lines of these fortifications delineated Jerusalem from the south in periods when the ancient city had reached its largest size.

The new finds were presented today (Wednesday) at a press conference that was held on Mount Zion. The excavation has been in progress for the past year and a half, under the direction of archaeologist Yehiel Zelinger of the Israel Antiquities Authority, in cooperation with the Nature and Parks Authority and with financial support provided by the Ir David Foundation.

You may read the entire news release at the IAA web page.

Here is an aerial photograph of the excavation, Mount Zion Valley. Photograph: Skyview, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority.

Aerial photo of Mount Zion valley. Skyview. Courtesy of Israel Antiquities Authority.

Aerial photo of Mount Zion valley. Skyview. Courtesy of Israel Antiquities Authority.

This pictures shows the excavation area.

Tsilla Sagiv. Courtesy of the IAA.

The excavated area. Photo: Tsilla Sagiv. Courtesy of the IAA.

Todd Bolen provides a concise summary of the information on this discovery at his BiblePlaces Blog.

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